Down The Rabbit Hole With Jacob Shelton: An Afternoon With Bernard Kulp

Down The Rabbit Hole With Jacob Shelton: An Afternoon With Bernard Kulp

Bernard Kulp bursts into his kitchen carrying a stack of manila envelopes. Over the next five hours he’ll repeatedly pull from these files and point to lengthy paragraphs that have been scanned and copied so many times that they look as if the ink has fallen out of the words. The first thing he says to me is, “Is this really you or is it your consciousness?” I don’t know how to respond so I pick up my water glass and I say, “Me?” I’ve never felt more insane. “I’m pretty sure myself and my consciousness are here together.” Kulp scowls at me and says, “We’ll see.” He fingers his folders for a moment before drumming his fingers on the table. “It’s not that I think everyone who projects their consciousness from another dimension is an evil pedophile or something, it’s just what my research shows.” Kulp raises his fist quickly until it’s parallel to my face, I flinch and he seems satisfied with this response. “That’s good,” he whispers to himself, “very good.”

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An Excerpt From Our Interview With Mind Detrgnt

An Excerpt From Our Interview With Mind Detrgnt

To read the full interview pick up issue 5, a thing you can do by clicking this link! Wow! HTML!

KP: What's Memphis like for graffiti?

MD: It's an awful place for graffiti. The biggest crew there is UH crew. I don't really like their shit, but that's what I grew up around. I didn't do shit like theirs. They do all that weird *makes ninja noises* crazy you know, complicated, illegible pieces and shit like that. I was never that into it. Me and my homie, we were both runaways and we would do shitty tags on Lexuses and shit like that. Me and him both wrote MIND DETRGNT. He never really got that into graffiti. He ended up getting more into music. He still plays music as MIND DETRGNT and he still makes collages that are MIND DETRGNT collages that are really cool. I used to do collages but I don't any more.

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An Excerpt From Our Interview With Fancy Lad

An Excerpt From Our Interview With Fancy Lad

To read the full interview pick up issue 5, a thing you can do by clicking this link! Wow! HTML!

KP: How did Fancy Lad get started?

BIG: The name Fancy Lad came from me working at a cafe with Legs who I guess you could say is on the team but not really because he doesn't really skate anymore. Same with Vey. I wish they had full parts but it's impossible to get it out of them. I was working at this bakery with Legs and our manager Phil was, I don't know how to describe him besides he was very...let's say, pretentious and kind of a snob...a little prissy in ways. We used to call Phil, Fancy Lad Phil. We got that term from Cabin Boy, the movie with Chris Elliot. So I was working there and we were using that as a derogatory term for really rich, pretentious hipster people. We thought it was funny because we were gonna make this low-fi, really shitty looking, whatever it is video. We were making that video and we finished it and I pretty much had no ambitions at the time. I was filming Fiske who skated for Heroin and he wanted to edit his own part. We just ended up making that video and it was just an afterthought. We showed it to Arty who used to own Coliseum and he suggested just printing one graphic and seeing what happens. We actually printed that VHS graphic which is still our best seller today. So, I guess we got lucky that he decided to print that one.

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An Excerpt From Our Interview With The Manx

An Excerpt From Our Interview With The Manx

Kill Pretty: Can you tell me how the band began?

TOMMY: Three of us were in this weird noise, grindcore scene in LA about 10 years ago playing in different bands. My band Razzle Blaster, Mykes band CO-OP, and Adam's band Oh Canada would all play these weird kinda DIY venues in LA like McWorld and The Cocaine. That's kinda how we all came to know each other. Those bands all broke up and we said, "Shit, let's hang out and start a new band together." We wanted to do something that wasn't so high concept because our previous projects we’re kinda larger than life ideas. So we said, "Let's just do folk-punk." Folk instruments. No amps no mics. Okay cool, this is simple, this is easy, we'll just show up at a park or behind a dumpster or at house party and play. That's how The Manx started. It started off as this throwaway thing.

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Director Lee Kronin Told Us What’s In The Hole In The Ground

Director Lee Kronin Told Us What’s In The Hole In The Ground

From the moment that The Hole in the Ground premiered at Sundance in 2019 audiences have been dying to know just what’s in that hole in the ground. I caught up with Irish director Lee Kronin and asked him point blank, “What’s in the hole in the ground.” His answers might shock you.

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An Excerpt From Our Interview With Everett Peck From Issue 3

An Excerpt From Our Interview With Everett Peck From Issue 3

In 1994 the USA network greenlit a little cartoon called Duckman. They had no idea at the time that they’d just given birth to the funniest, raunchiest and most heartwarming cartoon we’d ever see on TV. Creative genius, Everett Peck, was the man behind the duck. We interviewed him to hear the story of Duckman and attempted to get an up close and personal glimpse into his sticky, squishy duck brain.

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An Excerpt From Our Interview With Doug Stanhope

DS: I was just searching midget porn.

KP: For any specific reason or just to get off?

DS: I’m trying to buy DVDs of weird porn and I’m like, “How do you buy porn?” I can’t remember the last time I bought a hard copy DVD porn. We do porn and eggs parties, occasionally, for brunch. Last time we had a vintage porn that someone had sent us, like 1940’s shit, then there’s the potluck and… yeah.

KP: That shit’s crazy how they had to reel it on a reel and then set up a projector just to get 10 to 30 seconds of soundless porn.

DS: Yeah, but it wasn’t like that, it was more “burlesque,” girls stripping, it was just weird what we had, but it was funny. And then we waited as the day wore on and everyone got drunker and then we switched it out for hardcore tranny porn. So people noticed, “Oh, jeez,” but they stayed. So now it’s, “What do we want to do for the next one?” Do we do amputee porn, fatties, grannies - it can’t be regular porn. It’s gotta be weird on some level.

KP: You were probably jacking off in the ‘80s when you had to buy those boxes or rent them at video stores

DS: Yeah, in the ‘80s I had to rent them, but I had to go down to the liquor store when I lived in LA in the ‘90s and then they had them about cigarettes behind the counter. “What’s the title on that one? Yeah, I guess it can be that one. Just give me the longest compilation. I’ll fast forward.”

KP: Was it a lot harder to find really weird shit at that time or could you still find the weird amputee midget stuff?

DS: Well, when you were in a video store, they would have that back section and you could browse, but not like today. You couldn’t click on Youporn and type in a fuckin’ word.

KP: I’m really into psychedelics and as you can tell, the magazine is pretty psychedelic. I know you stopped taking them for a while and I’ve heard you talking about them again.

DS: I feel like I should the same way I feel like I Should get out and exercise more. I just hate doing it. Once I’m tripping, I’m glad I did. Just thinking about tripping, “Fuck, that’s like eight hours.” I hate puking and occasionally I’ll puke in the beginning. Drinking, at the end you go, “Oh, I’ll never drink again.” Psychedelics at the beginning you go, “Oh I don’t know if I want to go through with this.” At the end you’re like I’m so glad I did it.”

Need the rest of Doug’s story? You gotta buy the mag! Buy it HERE!

Full MARVL US Interview

Full MARVL US Interview

In every city there are writers that affect the world they paint. Some perfect their pieces, others obsess over destroying property and there's a million in between. Not all of them gain world wide success but the savages always have an affect. Kill Pretty loves learning about the over looked writers of different generations. The ones that put in the work, and it that town they are a household name.

MARVL US was a household name in the Bay Area. More like a legend. 10 years after he stopped writing we would still catch his tags hidden around skate spots and rusty old poles. US had it's own coveted place in the graffiti history of the bay (and still does) and MARVL seemed to be one of the most prolific and mysterious names in the crew. 

Sitting down to talk to MARVL was like stepping back into the early 90's. Everyone skated and everyone tagged. San Francisco was in the middle of a Renaissance that would last through the decade. 

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The Reptilian Conspiracy REVEALED With Reptile Afterbirth

The Reptilian Conspiracy REVEALED With Reptile Afterbirth

In case you haven't heard, there's a new boss in the rap game. Not only is he the number one spitter from down under, he's also a key figure in the reptile conspiracy. If you aren't already shouting his name, he is REPTILE AFTERBIRTH.

 

 

He's been rapping for years in Australia, breaking it down and keeping it real. Recently he's gained world wide acclaim for his youtube videos revealing deep secrets in the ancient reptilian conspiracy. We sat down with Mr. Afterbirth to get the real scoop.

 

How was the reptilian conspiracy revealed to you?

My uncle used to lock me in a cupboard and play 'reptilian conspiracy' with me after dark but I've since made some resolutions, so this year is gonna be different.

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MARVL US Interview Part 2

MARVL US Interview Part 2

You have a very specific one liner bus hopper type tag. Is that where it originated? Hopping busses?

That was from scribing bus windows. There are elements to a graffiti letter, right? A. It has gotta look cool B. you gotta do it fast so you can get up in a sick spot and make it look natural. Another kid gave me props for being on so many bus windows. I always had a rock. I didn’t even use the little grinder, scriber  tool. That’s cool but in terms of not being caught with a pocketful of utensils or whatever, the best thing is to find a small rock with a sharp side to it right before you get on the bus and when you’re done with it you just chuck it. But basically it’s just from scribing windows and wanting to do it really fast and if you stop and start too much it will look funky.

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MARVL US Interview Part 1

MARVL US Interview Part 1

In every city there are writers that affect the world they paint. Some perfect their pieces, others obsess over destroying property and there's a million in between. Not all of them gain world wide success but the savages always have an affect. Kill Pretty loves learning about the over looked writers of different generations. The ones that put in the work, and it that town they are a household name.

MARVEL US was a household name in the Bay Area. More like a legend. 10 years after he stopped writing we would still catch his tags hidden around skate spots and rusty old poles. US had it's own coveted place in the graffiti history of the bay (and still does) and MARVEL seemed to be one of the most prolific and mysterious names in the crew. 

Sitting down to talk to MARVEL was like stepping back into the early 90's. Everyone skated and everyone tagged. San Francisco was in the middle of a Renaissance that would last through the decade. Let's sit back and hear what MARVEL saw.

 

 

Tell me about writing in the early 90’s. What do you remember?

At the core of it, this is skateboard culture. We were all serious skaters. It’s this culture where you skate and you travel to all these different spots. As you travel to these different spots you hit up a tag. I saw other people doing that in ‘89 and I thought they were total degenerates. I was like, “Oh my god you did that right on that wall, you’re gonna fuck up this whole place for us.” Then later on I saw some more sophisticated graffiti and it was just one of those things. It was a whole new language.

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